Artwork Requirements - The Winning Team, Inc.
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Artwork Guidelines:

For best results we suggest your artwork be provided to us in vector format.

  •          All fonts in your designs must be converted to curves or paths.
  •          Adobe Illustrator CS4 - Files can be saved in .ai or .eps
  •          CorelDRAW - we suggest you export your files to .eps or .wmf
  •          Rasterized graphics - if you have no other file types available we can accept .jpg, .tif, .gif and .bmp. We may not be able to change background colors. Be sure to send the file in a minimum 300 dpi at actual size.

 

Do not hesitate to call with any questions. 800.310.8326.

 

 

Definitions:

Vector Graphic

Unlike JPEGs, GIFs, and BMP images, vector graphics are not made up of a grid of pixels. Instead, vector graphics are comprised of paths, which are defined by a start and end point, along with other points, curves, and angles along the way. A path can be a line, a square, a triangle, or a curvy shape. These paths can be used to create simple drawings or complex diagrams. Paths are even used to define the characters of specific typefaces.

Because vector-based images are not made up of a specific number of dots, they can be scaled to a larger size and not lose any image quality. If you blow up a raster graphic, it will look blocky, or "pixelated." When you blow up a vector graphic, the edges of each object within the graphic stay smooth and clean. This makes vector graph- ics ideal for logos, which can be small enough to appear on a business card, but can also be scaled to fill a billboard. Common types of vector graphics include Adobe Illustrator, Macromedia Freehand, and EPS files. Many Flash animations also use vector graphics, since they scale better and typically take up less space than bitmap images.

File extensions: .AI, .EPS, .WMF

Raster Graphics

Most images you see on your computer screen are raster graphics. Pictures found on the Web and photos you import from your digital camera are raster graphics. They are made up of grid of pixels, commonly referred to as a bitmap. The larger the image, the more disk space the image file will take up. For example, a 640 x 480 image requires information to be stored for 307,200 pixels, while a 3072 x 2048 image (from a 6.3 Megapixel digital camera) needs to store information for a whopping 6,291,456 pixels.

Raster graphics can typically be scaled down with no loss of quality, but enlarging a bitmap image causes it to look blocky and "pixelated." For this reason, vector graphics are often used for certain images, such as company logos, which need to be scaled to different sizes.

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